Frequently asked questions

Get answers to the most common car insurance questions.

Halifax Car Insurance is underwritten by a panel of insurers and is arranged and administered by BISL Limited. When getting a quote online you’ll be taken to BISL Limited’s online site with a new privacy and cookie policy.


Select one of the following six categories to start building your understanding of car insurance, and learn how Halifax can help:
 

Car insurance basics

  • The Motor Insurance Database (MID) makes it easy to check if a vehicle is insured. It’s a central record of all insured vehicles in the UK, which all insurers contribute to as members of the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB).

    You can:

    Check if your own vehicle is insured for free – you’ll just need to confirm you’re the owner or registered keeper of the vehicle.

    Check if someone else’s vehicle is insured – you might like to do this if you’ve been involved in an accident. An admin fee will apply.

    To enforce vehicle insurance laws, MID is also used by the Police and the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

  • Every car belongs to 1 of 50 insurance groups, characterised by factors including:

    • known model faults
    • the market value for your car
    • security features or modifications
    • repair cost, ease and availability of parts
    • vehicle engine size, age, mileage and condition

    Cars in insurance group 1 are the least expensive to insure. Those in group 50 cost the most.

    There are services available online where you can look up your vehicle’s insurance group. You'll just need to give your licence plate number, or the make and model of your car.

    These insurance groups are defined by the Association of British Insurers (ABI)

  • Car insurance excess is the amount you'll need to pay towards a claim against your policy. An insurer will pay any remaining costs covered by an insurance policy.

    Here’s a really simple example. Imagine you’ve had an accident, causing £2,500 worth of damage to your vehicle. Your car insurance policy requires you to pay an excess of £250, which means your insurer will cover the remaining amount of £2,250.

    There are a few types of excess, and more than one could apply to each claim, depending on the terms of your car insurance policy. The most common are:

    • standard or compulsory excess – as the name suggests, this is the standard amount you’ll need to pay towards any car insurance claim and is set by your insurer
    • voluntary excess – many insurers will allow you to set a higher excess amount. Although this could reduce your annual car insurance premium, you’ll need to pay more if you need to make a claim. Make sure you’re realistic about what you could afford if you had an accident
    • age excess – younger drivers could be offered car insurance with a higher excess amount, based on their level of driving experience and insurer insight about accident statistics
    • glass or windscreen excess – some policies include a separate excess amount covering glass claims

    Excess costs can vary, depending on the policy features you choose. Generally:

    • increasing your excess amount could reduce your annual premium
    • reducing your excess might increase your car insurance premium

    Check the terms of your car insurance policy carefully, so you understand any excess costs associated with making a claim.

  • The Association of British Insurers (ABI) regularly publishes results from their Motor Insurance Premium Tracker. In the first quarter of 2022, they recorded an average annual cost of £416 for comprehensive motor insurance.

    The actual cost could be a lot higher, depending on a range of factors, include your age, location, driving experience and the car you’re looking to insure.

    To find out how much car insurance could cost with Halifax, get a quote online.

    Source: ABI news article 05.05.2022

  • Your insurer will award you with a no claims discount for every claim-free year of motoring. These can accumulate over the years, and could potentially earn you a discount on your future insurance premium costs. This is also known as a no claims bonus.

    Even after a single year you could save up to 25%. After 5 years, you could save as much as 39%.*
    *source: BISL Limited annual average as at March 2022

    You can take your no claims discount with you if you switch to another insurer. Your new car insurance provider is likely to ask for proof of your no claims, which you can usually get from your previous insurer.

    How to give us your proof of no claims

    Drivers named on your insurance policy can also earn a no claims discount. This could help to reduce their car insurance costs in future.

    If you have an accident:

    • you’re likely to lose some or all of your no claims discount if the accident was your fault
    • your no claims discount might be unaffected if another driver was at fault and the cost of repairs can be recovered from their insurer
    • your no claims discount might be protected if you have comprehensive car insurance and it’s clear that you weren’t at fault. That could apply, even if the other driver is uninsured

    For an extra charge, most insurers offer the option to protect your no claims discount, even if you needed to claim.

  • In really simple terms, the money paid by motorists for car insurance contributes to a collective fund. If an insured driver has an accident and makes a valid claim, the money needed to complete any repairs, or cover any other damage, is paid out of the fund.

    The cost of car insurance, also known as a premium, can go up and down over time. The main thing which contributes to that, is the annual number of claims impacting the value of the insurance fund.

    Most insurers offer three types of cover:

    • Third party – this is the most basic level of car insurance, only covering damage to someone else’s vehicle or property if you cause an accident. It doesn’t cover your own car or property
    • Third party, fire and theft – the next level of insurance also covers your car for accidental or criminal fire damage, damage resulting from theft or attempted theft, and if your car is stolen
    • Comprehensive – this is the highest level of car insurance, also covering any damage to your car and property if you’re involved in an accident

    The cost of your individual insurance premium can vary, depending on a range of factors, including your age, location, driving experience and the car you’re looking to insure.

    You might be able to reduce the annual cost by adjusting the amount you’ll contribute out of your own pocket if you have an accident. This is commonly referred to as car insurance excess.

    • Increasing your excess amount could reduce your annual premium
    • Reducing your excess might increase your car insurance premium

    Optional extras might also be available, such as breakdown cover or legal protection, which you can add to your policy for an additional cost to your annual premium.

  • Yes, you can insure yourself to drive a car that you don’t own. When you apply, just make sure you tell the insurance company that you’re not the registered keeper of the vehicle.

    It’s worth knowing that the insurance premium could be higher in this situation. The types of cover you’re able to get might be more limited too.

    If you only need cover for a limited period of time, you could look for short-term car insurance.

    It might also be more cost-effective for the owner of the car to add you as a named driver on their insurance policy, instead of you applying for separate cover.

  • The policyholder is the person who took out a car insurance policy and would be covered if there is a claim.

    Cover can be extended to include named drivers, who will also be using the vehicle. For example, if your partner uses your car sometimes, or one of your children is learning to drive.

    Adding named drivers can increase your premium costs, especially if you’re adding a less experienced and higher risk driver to your policy.

    Make sure you check the policy terms and conditions to understand what’s covered, both for yourself, and any named drivers.

  • You can insure a car without having a valid MOT certificate. However it’s important to know that if you have an accident your insurer might not cover the cost of repairing any damage.

    It’s against the law to drive a car which is:

    • not taxed
    • not covered by a valid car insurance policy
    • over 3 years old and does not have a valid MOT certificate.

    For your safety, and the safety of others using the road, it’s important to make sure your car is insured and roadworthy.

    Source: gov.uk legal obligations of drivers and riders

  • The annual cost of car insurance is largely based on risk, and how likely you are to make a claim. For example, if you’ve recently passed your driving test and have limited experience on the road, your insurance premium will be higher than that of someone who has a long and claim-free driving record.

    Factors which can affect the cost of car insurance include:

    • Your age and occupation
    • Your estimated annual mileage
    • Any existing no claims discount
    • Security features or vehicle modifications
    • Any amount of voluntary excess you choose
    • Whether you live near a crime or accident hot spot
    • The insurance group, age and value of your vehicle
    • Any named drivers who will also be using your vehicle
    • What you generally use your car for. For example, travelling for work
    • Where you usually park overnight. For example, off-road or in a garage
    • Optional extras, such as enhanced legal assistance, guaranteed replacement car cover, breakdown cover etc

    The level of cover you choose will also make a difference to the cost, whether you opt for third party cover, third party, fire and theft or comprehensive cover.

    To find out how much car insurance could cost with Halifax, get a quote online.

  • No, you must have car insurance in order to tax a vehicle.

    You can send a payment to tax your car with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), without giving a copy of your insurance documents. However, they’ll check your insurance status before updating their records.

    Unless you’ve completed a Statutory Off-Road Notification (SORN) and your vehicle is securely parked on private property, the law is clear. Your car must be insured and taxed.

  • In addition to the level of cover you choose, there are several things which can affect the cost of your car insurance premium:

    • Your estimated annual mileage
    • Any existing no-claims discount
    • The group, age and value of your vehicle
    • Security features or vehicle modifications
    • Any amount of voluntary excess you choose
    • Whether you live near a crime or accident hot spot
    • Any named drivers who will also be using your vehicle
    • What you generally use your car for. For example, travelling for work
    • Where you usually park overnight. For example, off-road or in a garage
    • Optional extras, such as enhanced legal assistance, guaranteed replacement car cover, breakdown cover etc

    When shopping around for car insurance, make sure you check the terms and conditions carefully. Price is a key factor, but also make sure you’re getting the level of cover you’re most comfortable with.

  • One factor which can affect your annual car insurance premium, is the insurance group for your vehicle. There are 50 insurance groups, 1 being the least expensive, and 50 being the priciest.

    Insurance groups are defined based on a range of things, including:

    • Known model faults
    • The market value for your car
    • Security features or modifications
    • Repair cost, ease and availability of parts
    • Vehicle engine size, age, mileage and condition

Choosing car insurance

  • If you’re borrowing a car for a brief period of time, or you just need cover while you shop around for a policy to suit your longer-term needs, temporary insurance could be a cost-effective option.

    Halifax Temporary Car Insurance is perfect for a day out or weekend away. Need to borrow a friends car, or want to lend yours to a family member?

    • Get comprehensive insurance for the exact time you need it
    • We can provide cover for anything from 1 hour, up to 30 days
    • Flexible – only pay for the cover you need

    Terms, conditions and exclusions apply to all benefits.

    Halifax Temporary Car Insurance is underwritten by Aviva and is arranged and administered by Dayinsure. 

    More on Temporary Car Insurance

  • If you use your car for work-related travel, other than commuting to your normal workplace, make sure your insurance will cover you if you have an accident. Common examples include:

    • Attending conferences or meetings
    • Travel between offices or clients
    • Visiting customers
    • Errands for work

    This could increase the cost of your premium, simply because you’re likely to be covering more miles, at busier times and on unfamiliar roads.

    There are three types of insurance for business use, so pick the one which best suits your needs:

    • Class 1 provides cover for travel between offices, or occasional client visits
    • Class 2 offers the same cover as class 1, but includes a named driver, usually from the same business
    • Class 3 provides cover for drivers who travel regularly for work, such as reps or salesmen

    Each of these options also cover social, leisure and domestic use. However, they won’t cover using your car as a taxi, or to make deliveries, so you might need specialist insurance in those situations.

  • Yes, you can. Car insurance from Halifax also covers a few extras, specific to electric vehicles:

    • Battery cover – whether your battery is leased or owned, we cover accidental damage, fire and theft
    • Charging cable cover – again, you’ll be covered for accidental damage, fire and theft

    Terms, conditions and exclusions apply to all benefits.

    Just be aware, some manufacturers might expect you to buy separate battery insurance.

    Optional extras might also be available, such as breakdown cover or legal protection, which you can add to your policy for an additional cost to your annual premium.

  • Most insurers offer three types of cover:

    • Third party – this is the most basic level of car insurance, only covering damage to someone else’s vehicle or property if you cause an accident. It doesn’t cover your own car or property
    • Third party, fire and theft – the next level of insurance also covers your car for accidental or criminal fire damage, damage resulting from theft or attempted theft, and if your car is stolen
    • Comprehensive – this is the highest level of car insurance, also covering any damage to your car and property if you’re involved in an accident

    Optional extras might also be available, such as breakdown cover or legal protection, which you can add to your policy for an additional cost to your annual premium.

    Some insurers offer more specialist types of cover, including:

    • Multi-car insurance – allowing you to insure two or more cars under a single policy, and potentially save money on the cost of your premium
    • Telematics or ‘black box’ cover is most popular with young drivers. This involves having a device fitted to your vehicle which monitors the way you drive. Safer driving could result in cheaper premiums
    • Classic car insurance – as vintage cars are often only used for leisure; specialist cover could be cheaper than conventional insurance. Just be aware that mileage limits might apply
    • Insurance for driving abroad – if you’re planning to use your car outside the UK, make sure your existing policy will still cover you. If not, you’ll need to arrange extra cover for your trip
    • Temporary or short-term cover – if you’re borrowing a vehicle for a brief period of time, or you just need cover while you shop around for a policy to suits your needs, temporary cover could be a cost-effective option
    • Pay as you go car insurance can offer cover by the mile, hour or based on the way you drive, monitored using telematics. This could be an affordable option for low mileage drivers
    • Learner driver car insurance – as the name suggests, you can get cover designed especially for learners who want to practice their skills before taking their driving test
    • Business car insurance – if you’re using your car for business travel, as well as for commuting and social activities, make sure your vehicle is covered by appropriate insurance
    • Named driver cover – your existing policy can be extended to cover other people who will have access to use your car. Just be aware that adding a named driver can increase your premium costs
    • Track day insurance – your everyday insurance might not cover you if you use your own vehicle on a racetrack during an organised track day. In this situation, you can buy extra cover
    • Criminal conviction cover – even if it wasn’t a driving conviction, criminal charges can affect the cost and availability of car insurance. That’s where a specialist insurer might be able to help
    • Impounded car insurance – some policies will offer cover for the release and return an impounded car. If not, you might like to arrange extra cover

    As with any financial product or service, it’s important to shop around to find the right car insurance for your individual needs.

  • You don’t need to insure your car if you’ve completed a Statutory Off-Road Notification (SORN) and your vehicle is securely parked on private property.

    However, you must have motor insurance if you use or park your car on roads and public places. If you don’t, you could face:

    • a fixed monetary penalty of £80
    • a court prosecution with a fine of up to £2,500
    • having your car clamped, impounded or even destroyed

    That’s in addition to your insurance costs, which you might still need to pay.

    Source: gov.uk when you need to make a SORN

  • In addition to fines, penalty points could be applied to your driving licence if you commit a driving offence. These could include speeding, driving a car which isn’t roadworthy and careless driving.

    Depending on the seriousness of the offence, the number of points you’re issued can vary. Points could stay on your licence for anything from four to eleven years.

    Some offences can also result in disqualification.

    Learn more about driving offences and penalty points at gov.uk.

    In terms of your car insurance, the main impact of having points on your licence is how much your premiums will cost. Penalty points can be an indicator of risk, pushing the price of insurance up.

    It’s important to tell your insurer about any points or convictions though. If you don’t keep your driving history up to date, it could invalidate your insurance. If you have an accident, you don’t want to risk having your claim refused, or your policy voided.

  • Some insurers offer multi-car insurance policies, allowing you to cover two or more cars under a single policy.

    Halifax don’t offer a multi-car policy right now, but to find out how much car insurance could cost with us, get a quote online.

  • Most insurers offer the option to protect your no claims discount, even if you need to claim. Just be aware that extra costs will usually apply.

    Halifax offer protection as an optional extra for customers with four+ years of no claims discount.

  • When choosing car insurance, cost is one factor. But it’s also important to make sure the cover you buy meets your individual needs.

    The most basic requirement is getting cover so that you can drive legally. But car insurance also offers peace of mind and financial protection.

    Depending on the level of cover you choose, insurance will help to cover the cost of any damage caused in an accident. That could include medical expenses and addressing any damage to vehicles and property.

    Most insurers offer three types of cover:

    • Third party – this is the most basic level of car insurance, only covering damage to someone else’s vehicle or property if you cause an accident. It doesn’t cover your own car or property
    • Third party, fire and theft – the next level of insurance also covers your car for accidental or criminal fire damage, damage resulting from theft or attempted theft, and if your car is stolen
    • Comprehensive – this is the highest level of car insurance, also covering any damage to your car and property if you’re involved in an accident

    The cost of your individual insurance premium can vary, depending on a range of factors, including your age, location, driving experience and the car you’re looking to insure.

    You might be able to reduce the annual cost by adjusting the amount you’ll contribute out of your own pocket if you have an accident. This is commonly referred to as car insurance excess:

    • Increasing your excess amount might reduce your annual premium
    • Reducing your excess could increase your car insurance premium

    Before you choose, think carefully about how much you could realistically afford to pay out if you had an accident.

    Optional extras might also be available, such as breakdown cover or legal protection, which you can add to your policy for an additional cost.

    When you’re browsing for car insurance, it could help to:

    • Have a copy of your existing policy, especially if you’re looking for equivalent cover
    • Think about the type of cover you need, based on the way you use your car
    • Have proof of any no claims – this could help you to secure a discount
    • Have your driving licence and car registration number to hand
    • Know the cost of your last premium, just for comparison
    • Work out your annual mileage for the year ahead

    Car insurance is one thing you hope you’ll never need to use. But choosing a policy which suits your needs will offer you peace of mind should anything happen.

Buying car insurance

  • If you can’t remember which insurer your policy is with, there are a few ways to find out:

    • Search your email inbox – most insurers will send you a confirmation and important policy details by email. Try searching for ‘insurance’, ‘car insurance’ or even your vehicle’s registration number
    • Check your bank statements – look out for payments you’ve made to an insurance provider
    • Check that pile of post – you might have received letters from your car insurer
    • Do you use price comparison websites? You could sign into your profile to retrieve past quotes. This could help to remind you
    • Contact the Motor Insurance Database (MID) – you can check that your car is insured online, then submit a request for more details. You’ll need to give some information to prove your identity

    If your policy is due to expire, your insurer will usually contact you at least 21 days before your renewal or policy expiry date.

    If your car is uninsured, the Continuous Insurance Enforcement (CIE) scheme will get in touch. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) might also send you a penalty notice.

    It’s a legal requirement for your car to be insured and taxed if you’re using, or even just parking a car on public roads. In addition to fines, if you’re found to be uninsured you could be issued penalty points on your driving licence, be disqualified or even face prosecution.

    Learn more about driving offenses and penalty points at gov.uk.

  • When you’re shopping for insurance, you’ll be asked to estimate the value of your vehicle. This is usually the amount you paid for the car, minus any potential decrease in value since you’ve had it – also referred to as depreciation.

    There are lots of websites which offer free valuations which could give you an idea, including Autotrader, The AA and some price comparison websites.

    Just make sure you factor in any modifications your vehicle has which might increase its value, such as driver assist or entertainment packages. You should also tell your insurer about these.

    If you were to have an accident and your car couldn’t be repaired, depending on the type of cover you have and who was at fault, your insurer might only pay out the market value of your car.

    The value of your car could also influence the cost of your premium, in combination with other factors like your age, the insurance group for your vehicle, and so on.

    If your car is valuable, insurers might dictate a higher excess amount which you’ll need to pay out of your own pocket if you have an accident.

    Resist the temptation to underestimate the value of your car though, even if it would help you to save money on your insurance costs. Worse than not receiving your car’s true value when you’ve had an accident, it could invalidate your insurance if you don’t give accurate information.

  • Like most insurers, you can get a car insurance quote from Halifax online, or by phone. To complete a quote, you’ll need to give us some information:

    Your details – we’ll need some basic information, including:

    • driving licence details for all named drivers
    • Your name, address, date of birth and occupation
    • details of any no claims discount, past claims and driving offenses

    Your car – we’ll ask for information about the vehicle you plan to insure, including:

    • an estimate of your mileage for the year ahead
    • the make, model and registration number if you know it
    • details about any modifications which could affect your insurance premium
    • how you plan to use the car, such as commuting to work, domestic, social or business use
    • whether your car will be securely parked overnight. For example, in a garage or on the street

    Your cover – at Halifax we offer three levels of car insurance:

    • Third party – a basic level of car insurance, only covering damage to someone else’s vehicle or property if you cause an accident. It doesn’t cover your own car or property
    • Third party, fire and theft – this level of insurance also covers your car for accidental or criminal fire damage, damage resulting from theft or attempted theft, and if your car is stolen
    • Comprehensive – this is the highest level of car insurance, also covering any damage to your car and property if you’re involved in an accident

    The cost of your individual insurance premium can vary, depending on a range of factors, including your age, location, driving experience and the car you’re looking to insure.

    You might be able to reduce the annual cost by adjusting the amount you’ll contribute out of your own pocket if you have an accident. This is commonly referred to as car insurance excess:

    • Increasing your excess amount could reduce your annual premium
    • Reducing your excess might increase your car insurance premium

    Before you choose, think carefully about how much you could realistically afford to pay out if you have an accident.

    Optional extras might also be available, such as breakdown cover or legal protection, which you can add to your policy for an additional cost.

    When completing a quote and for the duration of the policy, it’s important that the information you give is accurate. Failure to disclose correct and complete information could result in:

    • increased premiums
    • your policy being cancelled
    • having a claim rejected, or partially paid
    • your policy being invalidated, meaning you’re no longer covered
  • You can take your no claims discount with you if you switch to another insurer.

    Your new car insurance provider is likely to ask for proof of your no claims, which you can usually get from your previous insurer.

    If you’re moving from Halifax, you can access and manage your policy online using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

    If you’re moving to Halifax, to avoid the cost of your policy increasing or being cancelled, please send in your proof of no claims discount within 21 days of your policy start date.

    You can give proof in the form of a renewal invitation, or an insurer's letter.

    The proof must relate to a policy you've held within the last two years, showing:

    • details about any claims or losses
    • the registration details of the vehicle
    • the renewal or expiry date of the policy
    • no claims information in years or as a percentage

    How to give us proof of no claims

  • When you get a car insurance quote, the insurer will complete a ‘soft’ credit check, confirming that the information you’ve given is accurate.

    The credit reference agencies Halifax use include TransUnion, Experian and Equifax.

    Although they might be visible on your credit report, soft credit searches won’t affect your credit score, or your ability to get credit in future.

    When you go on to buy cover though, depending on how you choose to pay, there is potential for impact to your credit score.

    If you pay monthly, it’s like taking a 12-month loan with your insurer:

    • You’ll pay a bit more to cover any interest
    • A ‘hard’ credit check will be completed, which could affect your credit record
    • If you don’t keep up with your payments your policy could be cancelled, and your credit score could be affected. If you’re experiencing financial difficult at any time, please get in touch so we can find a way to help

    However, this is a flexible option. By sticking to your monthly payments, it could eventually help to improve your credit score.

    If you pay annually, there’s no aspect of credit, so you could benefit from:

    • a cheaper premium, with no interest to pay
    • the option to pay with a credit or debit card

    However, if you fall behind with your credit card or other bills as a result of paying your car insurance premium in one go, you could cause damage to your credit score.

    More on what affects your credit score

  • Each insurer sets their own expiry period, but with Halifax your quote is valid for 30 days, giving you time to consider your options.

    Of course, if you’re happy with the quote you’ve received, you might like to go ahead and purchase cover. The choice is yours.

    Just be aware, if any of your details change between getting a quote and buying cover, your premium costs could go up or down. But it’s important to give accurate information at all times, ensuring you’ve got the level of cover you need.

  • The Financial Conduct Authority have made some amendments to their General Insurance Pricing Practices (GIPP). New rules were introduced on 1 January 2022, meaning insurers must offer the same price to both new and existing customers.

    Previously, existing customers could face an increase in their premium costs when they received a renewal quote, sometimes referred to as a ‘loyalty penalty’.

    These new rules could result in lower renewal prices for existing car insurance customers. But, as insurers have a short-fall to make up, costs for new customers could be higher than they have been in recent years.

    It’s worth remembering that other factors could affect your car insurance renewal costs, including moving house, making a claim or changing your level of cover.

    If you’re an existing Halifax car insurance customer, you can access and manage your policy online at any time using the My Account service. This includes the option to manage policy renewals.

    If you’d prefer to chat to us by phone, call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

  • Most insurers offer the option to pay your annual car insurance premium in monthly instalments, subject to status, or as a single payment covering you for the year ahead.

    Paying monthly

    In essence, this involves taking a 12-month loan with your insurer. That means:

    • you’ll pay a bit more to cover any interest
    • your application will show on your credit record
    • If you don’t keep up with your payments your policy could be cancelled, and your credit score could be affected. If you’re experiencing financial difficult at any time, please get in touch so we can find a way to help

    However, spreading the cost of your car insurance could help you to:

    • avoid a single hit to your monthly budget
    • automate your payments with a simple Direct Debit
    • improve your credit score over time by sticking to your payment plan

    Paying annually

    By paying for your car insurance in one go, you could benefit from:

    • a cheaper premium, with no interest to pay
    • the option to pay with a credit or debit card

    Obviously, the main disadvantage is having to pay out a lump sum, all at once.

    You should also be aware that, if you don’t keep up with your credit card and other payments, your credit score could be affected, and your accounts or policies could be restricted or cancelled.

  • The number of miles you’ll drive in the coming year is one factor which can affect the cost of your car insurance premium. In simple terms, miles equal potential vehicle wear and higher risk of incident.

    If you overestimate your mileage, you’ll be paying a higher premium than you really need to.

    If you underestimate your mileage, you risk:

    • increased premiums
    • your policy being cancelled
    • having a claim rejected, or partially paid
    • your policy being invalidated, meaning you’re no longer covered

    So, how do you make sure your estimate is as accurate as possible?

    Think about your weekly driving patters, including:

    • the distance you travel to and from work
    • shopping or running errands
    • social trips

    Once you’ve worked out a number of miles per week, multiply that by 52, then add a bit extra to account for things like spontaneous days out, or holiday travel.

    If you’ve been driving for some time, you might already have an idea about the number of miles you drive in a typical week, month or year.

    Your mileage is recorded on your MOT and car servicing certificates, so if you’ve got the last two to compare, that could also offer an indication on your annual mileage.

    If you know your circumstances are going to change in the near future, you might want to factor that into your calculation. For example, perhaps you’re starting a new job closer to home, so you won’t be driving as far each day.

    Whenever it happens, it’s important to let your car insurer know about a change in your circumstances which might affect your cover.

    If you’re an existing Halifax car insurance customer, you can access and manage your policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to tweak your cover.

    If you’d prefer to chat to us by phone, call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

  • Some cars are fitted with specialist tracking devices, making it possible to locate a stolen vehicle. From an insurance point of view, having one of these security devices fitted could help to reduce the cost of your premium.

    Some models of car have security trackers fitted as standard. If you’re unsure, it’s worth checking the owner’s manual for your vehicle, or contacting the manufacturer direct.

    If you don’t have a tracking device, you might be interested in having one fitted. In addition to the device itself, the security company you choose might also charge a regular fee for using their services.

    However, if you’re concerned about security, a tracker could act as a deterrent, as well as affording you peace of mind.

    There are a few types available:

    • Very High Frequency (VHF) signal tracking – using this technology, a vehicle can be located even if it’s hidden in a garage, underground car park or shipping container
    • Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking – satellite technology makes it possible to locate a vehicle anywhere in the world, as long as the signal is not interrupted

    There are some systems which use both types of technology.

    If your vehicle is stolen, but you have a tracking device fitted, the police will work in collaboration with your chosen security company to find and return your car.

    Vehicle security companies might also offer other security features, including:

    • sensors which trigger when your car is tampered with/started without a key
    • alerts if your vehicle is being driven at an unusual time or place
    • Verbal communication with the monitoring system, making it possible to speak to the thief
    • Remote engine kill – bringing the car to a safe stop and preventing it from being started again

    It’s not a legal requirement for you to have extra security features on your car, but there are potential benefits if you want to invest in added protection.

  • Thatcham Research independently rates the different car alarms, immobilisers and other security devices which can be fitted to a car, either by manufacturers or security conscious individuals.

    Thatcham employ a number of categories to certify or approve each device they review:

    • Thatcham category 1 is the top tier, characterised by a combined alarm and immobiliser
    • Thatcham category 2 provides a rating for electric immobilisers only
    • Thatcham category 2/1 covers category 2 vehicles fitted with an upgraded alarm system
    • Thatcham Category 3 provides a rating for mechanical immobilisers only
    • Thatcham Category 4 covers wheel locking devices, including specialised wheel nuts
    • Thatcham Category S5 provides a rating for vehicle tracking and recovery systems
    • Thatcham Category S7 is the same as S5, but with single-location immobilisation
    • Q class systems are additions which aren’t approved by Thatcham

    Some models of car have security features fitted as standard. For example, car immobilisers have been compulsory for all cars manufactured since 1998.

    If you’re unsure which security features your car has, it’s worth checking the paperwork for your vehicle, or contacting the manufacturer direct.

    From an insurance point of view, a good Thatcham security rating for your car could help to reduce the cost of your premium each year.

If you've had a car accident

  • We know that being in an accident can be stressful, so first of all, take a breath. We genuinely hope that everyone is ok, even if the same can’t be said for your car.

    Shock can make it difficult to remember details, so we recommend submitting your claim within 24 hours, just while details are fresh in your mind.

    To make a claim, call: 0344 209 0472

    Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    To help us process your claim, we’ll need:

    • your Halifax car insurance policy number
    • the date, time and location of the accident or incident
    • to know if the police of emergency services were involved
    • details about anyone involved, including other drivers and eyewitnesses

    At the scene of an accident of incident, here are a few things you should do:

    • Is anyone hurt? If so, the most important thing is to call emergency services straight away
    • Stay where you are – if another driver was involved, you’ll need to exchange insurance details. If not, is there anyone you might need to report the incident to? You’ll also need to check your car over to establish whether it’s safe to drive. If in doubt, or your car is too damaged to drive, you might need to call a vehicle recovery service
    • Avoid laying blame – whoever is at fault, this can be established and handled during your claim. Resist the temptation to admit blame, offer to pay for any damage or, on the other hand, blame others. Adding heat to the situation won’t help anyone
    • Collect information – make a note of any other driver names, addresses, contact details and vehicle registration numbers. If there are other witnesses at the scene, ask for their details too. As long as it’s safe to do so, take pictures and videos of the scene and any damage caused to all vehicles. This can help to show the extent of any damage, as well as the driving conditions on the day. You could also make a sketch of the scene to show the position of any vehicles and witnesses. All of this evidence could help if there’s a dispute.
  • Car insurance excess is the amount you'll need to pay towards a claim against your policy.

    • If you were at fault, the cost of insured repairs will come from your insurer’s fund
    • If someone else was at fault, hopefully costs will be recovered from their insurer.

    There are two main types of excess:

    Standard or compulsory excess – as the name suggests, this is the standard amount you’ll need to pay towards any car insurance claim.

    Voluntary excess – many insurers will allow you to set a higher excess amount. Although this could reduce your annual car insurance premium, you’ll need to pay more if you need to make a claim.
    Make sure you’re realistic about what you could afford if you were involved in an accident.

    Check the terms of your car insurance policy carefully, so you understand any excess costs. Both compulsory and voluntary excess can apply in some circumstances.

    It’s your decision whether you want to claim on your insurance. Depending on the excess amount you’ve set on your policy, for small repairs it might be cheaper to pay out of your own pocket.

    If you’re in an accident though, you still need to inform your insurer, even if you don’t plan to claim.

  • Car insurance can vary between policies and providers, so the best way to check what’s covered is to review your policy documents.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

    If you have comprehensive car insurance, you can make a claim regardless of who was at fault. Just be aware, you might need to pay excess on your claim, and your no claims discount could be lost or reduced if your insurer can’t recover expenses from a third party’s insurer.

    If you have third party or third party, fire and theft car insurance, you can still make a claim through your own insurer. If you’re found to be at fault, once you’ve paid any excess, damage caused to other vehicles and property will be covered. However, you’ll have to pay for any damage to your own vehicle yourself.

    To chat to us about your Halifax car insurance policy by phone, call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    Or to make a claim, call: 0344 209 0472

    Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  • The Motor Insurance Database (MID) makes it easy to check if a vehicle is insured. It’s a central record of all insured vehicles in the UK, which all insurance companies contribute to as members of the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB).

    If you’re there when an accident or incident takes place, collect as much information as possible.

    Make a note of any other driver names, addresses, contact details and vehicle registration numbers. If there are other witnesses at the scene, ask for their details too.

    As long as it’s safe to do so, take pictures and videos of the scene and any damage.

    If you find out that the driver was uninsured, either before or after you’ve made a claim, it’s important that you contact the police within:

    • five days if there’s damage to your car or property
    • 14 days if you you’ve been injured in an accident

    You should also contact your insurer.

    If you have comprehensive car insurance, although the process will be more complicated, you should still be able to make a claim.

    It’s just useful to know that, depending on the terms of your individual policy, you might lose some or all of your no claims discount, and your insurance premiums could increase.

    If you only have third party or third-party fire and theft cover, you might be able to make a claim through the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB). An excess charge might apply.

    If you’re not around when an accident or incident takes place, and the person at fault leaves no information for you to follow up on, they’d be classed as an untraceable driver.

    In this situation, although it’s still important to contact your insurer, your first phone call should be to the Police. To stand any chance of making a successful claim, you’ll need help to gather evidence, which could include:

    • CCTV footage
    • Dash-cam footage
    • Witness statements
    • Photographs of damage, and even related marks on road surfaces

    The Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB) handle untraceable driver claims made within nine months of the event. Again, an excess charge might apply.

    MIB will also work with the Police to establish who was at fault.

    If you were wholly or partially responsible, the amount you receive could be reduced, or your claim will be rejected entirely.

  • Acts of deliberate vandalism include:

    • Graffiti
    • Slashed tyres
    • Smashed windows
    • Paintwork scratches

    If you return to your car to find it’s been vandalised, the first thing you need to do is contact the Police to get a crime reference number.

    The government website also invites you to report vandalism.

    Depending on the situation, the Police might also get involved to collect evidence, including:

    • Camera footage
    • Witness statements
    • Photographs of damage and related road surface marks

    If it’s safe to do so, take your own pictures of the damage, but always follow the advice given by the Police when you contact them.

    Next, you’ll need to contact your insurer.

    If you have comprehensive car insurance, it’s likely you’ll be able to claim for malicious damage.

    Just be aware:

    • You might need to pay excess on your claim
    • Your insurance premium costs could increase
    • You could lose some or all of your no claims discount

    If you have third party or third party, fire and theft car insurance, damage caused by vandals is not usually covered. That means you’ll have to pay for any repairs yourself.

    For Halifax car insurance claims, call: 0344 209 0472

    Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

  • If you find that your car has been stolen, the first thing you need to do is contact the police. They’ll:

    • record your vehicle as stolen on the Police National Computer (PNC)
    • inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)
    • issue a crime reference number

    They’ll ask for the registration number, make, model and colour of your car, as well as details about any personal belongings that were inside.

    Depending on the situation, the police might also get involved to collect evidence, including:

    • Camera footage
    • Witness statements

    Next, you’ll need to contact your insurer.

    If you have comprehensive or third party, fire and theft car insurance, it’s likely you’ll be able to claim for vehicle theft.

    There are some exceptions. You might not be covered if:

    • you leave your keys in or near the car
    • you’ve left your car running and unattended
    • you’ve left your car unlocked, or with windows open
    • where the signal from your key is hacked, resulting in ‘relay theft’

    If you only have third party cover, you’re unlikely to be covered.

    If your car is found and returned within seven to fourteen days, and there’s little or no damage, your insurer should be able to settle a valid claim relatively quickly.

    If your car cannot be found, or it’s damaged beyond repair, a valid claim might result in you being offered the market value for your car.

    In the hopes of it being returned, most insurers will wait 30 days before paying out on a stolen vehicle insurance claim.

    For Halifax car insurance claims, call: 0344 209 0472

    Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    Tips for keeping your car safe:

    • Use a steering wheel lock
    • Park your car in a locked garage if you can
    • Try not to keep valuables in your car, tempting thieves
    • Consider fitting CCTV and motion detection lighting at home
    • If your car doesn’t have a car alarm, you might want to fit one
    • Park your car in a well-lit area and close to your property
    • With some keyless fobs, you might be able to turn the wireless signal off
    • Store keys away from doors or windows, ideally in a signal blocking (faraday) box or pouch
    • Get your Vehicle Identity Number or registration etched onto your car windows and mirrors

    If you lose your keys, it’s important to contact a Master Locksmiths Association approved auto locksmith who can help you to secure your vehicle.

  • If you’re making a Halifax car insurance claim and your vehicle needs to be repaired, we’ll be able to discuss your options with you.

    You might prefer not to pursue a claim if minor repairs would cost less than the excess amount you’ll have to contribute.

    In situations where your car needs lots of costly repairs which we would cover, it’s likely that you’ll want to continue with your claim.

    We’ll give you details of approved repair workshops in your area, which should help by speeding up the process. You won’t need to shop around for repair quotes.

    Any repairs made by an approved garage will also be covered by a guarantee.

    You can use a repair shop of your choice if you’d prefer.

    If you go ahead and get repairs done before your insurer has agreed to pay, you’ll be responsible for all costs until your claim is settled.

    For Halifax car insurance claims, call: 0344 209 0472

    Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

  • Cover can vary significantly between policies and providers, so the best way to check what’s covered is to review your policy documents.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

    Halifax comprehensive car insurance covers glass damage as standard, providing an emergency helpline which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week: 0330 018 1889

    You also have the option to book online with our preferred partner, Auto Windscreens.

    Your no claims discount will not be affected by your claim, but if the glass has to be repaired or replaced, excess charges might apply.

    If your car insurance doesn't include windscreen cover, you’ll need to pay for the cost of replacement windows or repairs yourself.

  • If you’ve been involved in an accident or incident and your car is heavily damaged, it could be ‘written off’ – also known as a ‘total loss’.

    That doesn’t mean your car will go straight to the scrap yard, but your insurer has decided not to fund any repair work. It might not be financially viable to repair a vehicle if the cost would outweigh the value of the car itself.

    In that situation, an insurer might make a cash settlement, reflecting the market value of your car at the time of the accident.

    Once the claim is settled, it could be down to you to dispose of the car, but it’s more likely that your insurer will take ownership as part of the claim.

    In either case, it’s important that:

    • disposal is arranged in line with sustainability and industry approved guidelines
    • the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) are informed. You don’t want a £1,000 fine!
    • Any relevant finance companies are informed – you’ll need to settle any outstanding finance

    If the car is sold on, information about the vehicle’s history must be available to prospective buyers.

    There are currently four categories of vehicle write-off, defined by the Association of British Insurers (ABI) in their Code of Practice for Categorisation of Motor Salvage (PDF, 617 KB).

    Category A – the DVLA will no longer issue a V5 registration document for a vehicle in this category. Cars given this label are usually heavily damaged and must be scrapped – never returning to the road.

    Category B – again, the DVLA won’t issue a V5 document for vehicles in this category. There could be salvageable parts, but the body shell and any damaged components must be destroyed.

    Category S – applies to vehicles which need structural repairs, replacements and realignment to the original dimensions of the car. This excludes steering and suspension components.

    Category N – applies to vehicles which need non-structural repairs to safety-critical components.

    Although category S and N vehicles can be repaired, they’ll always carry a ‘salvage’ category.

    Repairs should be completed by a garage which is part of the Thatcham Research preferred network. Thatcham specialise in vehicle safety and testing.

    If you’d like to keep a car that’s been written off as a category S or N, you’ll need to speak to your insurer. Just be aware that costs might apply.

    If your insurer agrees, for a category S vehicle you’ll need to send them your logbook and apply for a new one from the DVLA. You won’t need to do this for a category N vehicle.

    While you might be able to keep a category S or N vehicle that’s been written off, even after repair some insurers might decline to insure it. If you can secure insurance, it’s likely that your premium costs will be higher than before any accident or incident.

    If you just want to keep a personalised licence plate which was on the vehicle, you’ll need to apply through the government website.

  • Regardless of who was at fault, making a car insurance claim can lead to an increase in your premium costs. This usually accounts for a perceived increase in risk.

    Claims can also have an impact on your no claims discount (NCD), depending on:

    • the type of claim you’re making
    • whether you’ve chosen to protect your NCD

    Non-fault claims

    This is where the fault lies completely with someone else. For example, if your car is securely parked and another driver reverses into it, any damage caused would be their fault.

    As long as your insurer can recover the repair costs from another driver’s insurance company, or from the individual themselves, the claim will be recorded as a non-fault claim on your insurance history.

    In this situation, it’s unlikely to affect your NCD.

    Fault claims

    If you’ve caused an accident, that will be recorded on your insurance claims history.

    This could also be the case in situations where the blame sits elsewhere, but your insurer can’t recover funds from elsewhere. For example, if your car is vandalised and the offender can’t be found.

    In this situation, you could lose some or all of your NCD.

    If you’re hit by an uninsured driver

    If you have comprehensive car insurance, although the process will be more complicated, you should still be able to make a claim. However, you could lose some or all of your NCD.

    If you only have third party or third-party fire and theft cover, you might be able to make a claim through the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB). An excess charge might apply.

    If you’re not around when an accident or incident takes place, and the person at fault leaves no information for you to follow up on, they’d be classed as an untraceable driver.

    In this situation, although it’s still important to contact your insurer, your first phone call should be to the Police. They might be able to gather evidence in support of a future claim.

    The Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB) handle untraceable driver claims made within nine months of the event. Again, an excess charge might apply.

    In claims where funds can’t be recovered, your NCD will be reduced, regardless of who was at fault:

    • Five or more years of NCD will be reduced to three years
    • Less than five years of NCD will be reduced by two years

    If you’ve chosen to protect your NCD with Halifax, you can make two claims in any three-year period without any impact or reduction. However, any further claims will affect your NCD.

  • Some losses won’t be covered by an insurer, including:

    • Any drop in your car’s value
    • The cost of alternative transport
    • Compensation for personal injuries
    • Excess costs when you make a claim
    • Loss of earnings resulting from your car being out of action

    Many car insurance policies do offer motor legal protection though, which could help with the recovery of uninsured losses.

    In situations where a third party is at fault, you should start by writing to the individual and giving them details about your uninsured losses. If you can’t settle your claim with a third party or their insurer, you’ll might want to seek legal advice.

    Depending on the circumstances, you might be able to take your claim to small claims court:

    • In claims of £10,000 or less in England and Wales
    • In claims of £3,000 or less in Northern Ireland and Scotland

    Source: gov.uk make a court claim for money

  • Car insurance claims are generally treated as ‘non-fault’ or ‘fault’. We’ll discuss the incident with you, and any third parties who are involved, then decide how to move things forwards.

    First though, if your car is un-driveable it will be recovered from the scene and taken to an approved repairer, or a garage of your choice.

    Non-fault claims

    This is where the fault lies completely with someone else. For example, if your car is securely parked and another driver reverses into it, any damage caused would be their fault.

    As long as your insurer can recover the repair costs from another driver’s insurance company, or from the individual themselves, the claim will be recorded as a non-fault claim.

    In this situation, it’s unlikely to affect your no claims discount (NCD).

    Fault claims

    If you’re found to be at fault, either wholly or partially, that will be recorded on your insurance claims history. In this situation, you could also lose some or all of your NCD.

    It’s important to know that a fault claim doesn’t always mean that you were to blame.

    For example, if your car is vandalised and the offender can’t be found, that’s classed as a fault claim. Your insurer won’t be able to recover funds from elsewhere.

    What’s next?

    Once fault has been established, our underwriters will work to process your claim, keeping you informed at each stage.

    If you need legal help, especially in situations where there’s uninsured loss and personal injury, we can help by appointing a solicitor in your local area.

    We only offer a courtesy car with our comprehensive cover, but you can add a guaranteed replacement car to any of our policies for an extra cost.

    Courtesy cars are supplied by the garage repairing the vehicle as a result of a claim, subject to availability.

    Terms, conditions and exclusions apply. You won’t qualify if your car is stolen or written off.

    If you have guaranteed replacement car cover, we’ll provide a car from a leading national rental network, whether your car is stolen, written off, is un-driveable or you’re simply waiting for a courtesy car to become available.

    Just so you know: you could be contacted by third parties offering services to deal with your claim. We only use our own approved providers and do not forward your details to anyone else.

    If you are at all unsure, take the details of the caller and contact us to confirm they’re genuine before providing any personal information over the phone.

  • Yes. You must tell your insurer about any accidents or incidents you’ve been involved in within the last five years, even if you don’t plan to make a claim on your car insurance.

    It could invalidate your policy if you don’t give full and accurate information.

    Insurers share and check information using various databases, including the Claims and Underwriting Exchange (CUE), so it’s likely that anything you don’t disclose will be picked up.

    In addition, if a third party is involved, even if you don’t make a claim, they might.

    Although it could result in an increase in your car insurance premium, honesty is the best policy.

    It’s your decision whether you want to claim on your insurance to repair any damage.

    Depending on the excess amount you’ve set on your policy, for small repairs it might be cheaper to pay out of your own pocket.

    Either way, you need to inform your insurer if you’re ever involved in an accident or incident.

About your car insurance policy

  • Many people assume that having comprehensive car insurance allows them to drive other vehicles. For example, you might drive a relative’s car once in a while.

    It’s important to know that you’re only covered to drive another car if:

    • you’re named as a driver on the insurance policy covering the car you plan to use
    • your own insurance policy states that you can use another car. You’ll usually find this on your Certificate of Insurance

    Of course, the car you drive must also be insured by the registered keeper or owner.

    Even if you have comprehensive insurance on your own car, make sure you check the policy details carefully before getting behind the wheel.

    You might only be protected:

    • For some purposes, such as social or domestic, but not business use
    • By third party cover, rather than a higher level of cover you might have on your own car
  • Cover can vary significantly between policies and providers, so the best way to check what’s covered is to review your policy documents.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

    Halifax comprehensive car insurance covers glass damage as standard, providing an emergency helpline which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week: 0330 018 1889

    You also have the option to book online with our preferred partner, Auto Windscreens.

    Your no claims discount will not be affected by your claim, but if the glass has to be repaired or replaced, excess charges might apply.

    If your car insurance doesn't include windscreen cover, you’ll need to pay for the cost of replacement windows or repairs yourself.

    In addition to accidental and criminal damage, windscreens can be affected by:

    • chips resulting from loose stones and debris on the road hitting the glass
    • cracks resulting from glass weakened by heat and chilly weather
    • both can impair your vision and distract you, which isn’t what you want when you’re driving

    Below are some basic tips for vehicle glass care:

    • Keep washer fluid and anti-freeze topped up
    • Replace your windscreen wipers as soon as they show signs of wear
    • If frost is expected, use a cover to protect the windscreen overnight
    • Defrost your windscreen slowly – avoid using hot water or sharp scrapers
  • Car insurance can vary significantly between policies and providers, so the best way to check what’s covered is to review your policy documents.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

    We only offer a courtesy car with our comprehensive cover, but you can add a guaranteed replacement car to any of our policies for an additional cost.

    Courtesy cars are supplied by the garage repairing the vehicle as a result of a claim, subject to availability

    Terms, conditions and exclusions apply. You won’t qualify if your car is stolen or written off.

    If you have guaranteed replacement car cover, we’ll provide a car from a leading national rental network, whether your car is stolen, written off, is un-driveable or you’re simply waiting for a courtesy car to become available.

  • If your policy is due to expire, your insurer will usually contact you at least 21 days before your renewal or policy expiry date.

    If you don’t take any action, most insurers will automatically renew your policy, preventing you from becoming uninsured.

    If you don’t want to auto-renew with us, or you’d like to discuss the renewal quote you receive from Halifax, please get in touch.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to manage policy renewals.

    If you’d prefer to chat to us by phone, call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

  • Car insurance can vary significantly between policies and providers, so the best way to check what’s covered is to review your policy documents.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

  • It’s important to check the details of your car insurance policy before you drive outside the UK.

    In terms of Halifax car insurance, whether you choose comprehensive, third-party fire and theft, or just third party, you’re covered when driving in:

    • Great Britain, including Northern Ireland
    • throughout the European Union and European Economic Area
    • the Channel Islands
    • the Isle of Man
    • Switzerland

    If you’re planning to drive further afield, you’ll need to arrange extra cover. Terms, conditions and exclusions apply to all levels of cover.

  • Below is useful information about Green Cards, also known as International Motor Insurance Cards.

    On 30 June 2021, the EU Commission announced their decision to waive Green Card requirements.

    From 2 August 2021 onwards you no longer need apply for or provide proof of a Green Card. This applies to vehicles, towed cars and trailers when driving in the EU and European Economic Area.

    You don’t need a Green Card to drive in: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

    But you might need a Green Card to drive in: Albania, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Iran, Israel, Moldova, Morocco, Russia, Tunisia, Turkey and Ukraine.

    It’s important to check the details of your car insurance policy before you drive outside the UK.

    Cover in some countries is subject to the agreement of your insurer. An extra premium cost might apply, in line with the terms of your policy.

    If you’re travelling to a country where you’ll need a Green Card, contact us at least 21 days before you travel: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    If we’re happy to provide cover and you’ve paid any extra premium costs, we’ll issue and send your Green Card to your home address.

    Before you travel, remember to pack your Green Card, a copy of your certificate of insurance, your driving licence and V5C logbook. If there isn’t one on your registration plate already, display a UK sticker on your vehicle.

    To drive in some European Union and European Economic Area countries, you might also need an International Driving Permit.

    If you’re planning to tow a trailer, you might need to register that before you travel.

    Helpful gov.uk guides:

    You’ll also find useful information from the Motor Insurers’ Bureau.

  • Before you drive towing a caravan, trailer or horse box, it’s important to check the details of your car insurance policy, driving licence and your vehicle’s safe towing weight.

    Your insurance policy – it depends on the terms of your policy, but many insurers only provide third party cover for damage you cause to someone else’s property, but not any repairs to your caravan, trailer or anything transported inside. For your peace of mind, you might want to get an extra insurance policy to provide enhanced cover.

    If in doubt, it’s worth contacting your insurer.

    Your driving licence – what you can legally tow depends on:

    • when your driving licence was issued
    • whether you’ve taken any advanced driving tests
    • the combined Maximum Authorised Mass (MAM) of your towing vehicle, trailer and load

    If your licence was issued before 1 January 1997, you can drive a towing vehicle and trailer with a MAM of up to 8,250kg.

    To tow more, you would have to pass a category C theory test and the C1+E practical test. This would allow you to drive a rigid lorry towing a trailer with a combined MAM of up to 12,000kg.

    If your licence was issued between 1 January 1997 and 19 January 2013, you can:

    • drive a vehicle with a MAM of up to 3,500kg, towing a trailer of up to 750kg
    • tow a trailer over 750kg if the combined MAM of the trailer and vehicle is under 3,500kg

    To tow more, you’d have to pass a B+E trailer test, allowing you to tow a trailer of any size.

    If your licence was issued after 19 January 2013, you can:

    • tow a trailer weighing no more than 750kg
    • tow a trailer over 750kg if the combined MAM of the trailer and vehicle is under 3,500kg

    To tow more, you’d have to pass a B+E trailer test, allowing you to tow a trailer up to 3,500kg.

    Your vehicle’s safe towing weight – anything you’re towing should never be over 85% of your towing vehicles kerb weight. That’s the weight of your vehicle, excluding passengers or cargo.

    To find this out, refer to your vehicle identification number (VIN) plate. This can be located in a few places, depending on the car, but start with the inside of the door frames, or under your car bonnet.

    In addition to the 17-digit chassis number, you’ll also find information about tyre pressures and your vehicle weight. Figure A is the gross weight (MAM) of the vehicle. Figure B is the gross train weight, which is the maximum combined weight for your vehicle and anything you’re towing.

    To calculate the maximum weight for a trailer, caravan or horse box, subtract figure A, from figure B.

    To weight a trailer or caravan, you’ll need to visit a local weighbridge. There could be a small fee for this service. It’s useful to weigh your car and whatever you’ll be towing when they’re both empty, and again once you’re all packed.

    If the weight exceeds the legal limit, not only will it be illegal to drive and tow, but if you had an accident your insurance could be invalidated.

    Other tips for when you’re towing something:

    • The maximum length of a trailer should be more than 7m
    • The maximum width of a trailer should be no more than 2.55m
    • If you’re towing something wider than your vehicle, you must use towing mirrors
    • You should have working lights and reflectors on your caravan, trailer or horse box
    • You must use a tow bar that’s designed for your vehicle, and which meets EU regulations
    • You must display a number plate on your trailer which matches that of the towing vehicle

    Also watch your speed and driving position when towing a caravan, trailer or horse box:

    • In built-up areas, observe a maximum speed limit of 30mph
    • On a single carriageway the maximum is 50mph
    • On a dual carriageway or motorway, it’s 60mph

    When towing, it’s illegal to drive in the outside lane of a motorway.

    Source: gov.uk towing with a car

  • It’s worth checking your policy information, but drivers named on your insurance policy might be able to earn a no claims discount, which could help to reduce their own car insurance costs in future.

  • When your car insurance policy is ending, you usually have two options:

    1. Stay with your current insurer

    Most insurers will automatically renew your policy, just so you don’t end up being uninsured. Simply get in touch if you don’t want to auto-renew, or you’d like to discuss the renewal quote you get

    If your policy is due to expire, your insurer will usually contact you at least 21 days before your renewal or policy expiry date.

    You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to manage policy renewals.

    If you’d prefer to chat to us by phone, call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    2. Shop around for a new deal

    Just make sure you have a new policy in place to pick up from the date that your old policy ends.

    You can take your no claims discount with you if you switch to another insurer. Your new car insurance provider is likely to ask for proof of your no claims, which you can usually get from your previous insurer.

  • You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to view, download or print your policy documents.

Managing your car insurance policy

  • If you’re using your own private car for local voluntary purposes, such as delivering medicine or groceries to support others, you’ll be covered as normal.

    You don’t need to let us know, or make any changes to your car insurance policy.

  • If you’re planning to transport goods to aid the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine, below is some information you might find useful.

    If you’re using your own private car to transport goods within the UK, or the European Economic Area, you don’t need to let us know or make any changes to your car insurance policy.

    In the UK, you’ll be covered as normal.

    Within the European Economic Area our motor insurance policy will provide, as a minimum, third party liability coverage for the duration of the policy.

    However, we recommend that you check your policy documents carefully for limits of coverage and policy exclusions. In addition, we encourage you to familiarise yourself with regulations around the cross-border transport of goods and abide by any travel advice issued by the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office.

    Important: your policy will not cover you to drive in the Ukraine. You should also be aware that damage or injury caused by war, conflicts or similar events is a common exclusion in motor insurance policies.

  • You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time.

    Using My Account you can:

    • get a quote for a second car
    • manage payments and renewals
    • add or remove named drivers
    • change your address and contact details
    • view, download or print your policy documents
    • change vehicle, what it’s used for, or the level of cover

    If you need to give us proof for your no claims discount, you can:

    Email: Halifaxcarinsurance@insurance-system.co.uk

    Write to: Fusion House, Katharine Way, Bretton, Peterborough, PE3 8BG

    To avoid the cost of your policy increasing or being cancelled, please send in your proof of no claims discount within 21 days of your policy start date.

    You can also contact us by phone. There are a few different numbers, depending on what you’re calling about, but below are the most popular options:

    • To amend your policy, call: 0344 209 0471
      Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays
      Important: policy changes could affect the cost of your premium
    • For car insurance claims, call: 0344 209 0472
      Speak to a representative 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
      You can also make a claim online.
  • You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to cancel.

    If you’d prefer to cancel by phone, you can call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    Fees might apply, depending on when you choose to cancel your car insurance policy.

    It’s also worth knowing that:

    • any refund you receive will be pro rata. For example, if there’s 6 months left on the policy, you can expect to be refunded half of the original cost, minus any fees
    • if you cancel early, you could lose any no claims you’d earn under your policy for that year
    • optional extras, like breakdown cover, might not be refundable

    If you do cancel your policy and still have a car which needs to be insured, make sure you have a new policy in place to pick up from the date that your old policy ends.

  • Yes, in most cases you should inform your insurer and the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) if you have a medical condition, or if you’re diagnosed with a new one. You should also update your medical information if your condition changes over time.

    ‘Notifiable conditions’ which could affect your ability to drive include:

    • Fainting
    • Epilepsy
    • Diabetes
    • Glaucoma
    • Sleep apnoea
    • Limb disabilities
    • Heart conditions and strokes
    • Neurological conditions like dementia

    Search the DVLA’s list of medical conditions you must report or browse their A-Z list.

    One exception is hearing impairments – there aren’t any current restrictions on driving a vehicle if you’re deaf or hard of hearing.

    You might also need to inform your insurer and the DVLA if you’re taking medication to treat a notifiable condition – for example, if you’re diabetic and manage your condition with insulin.

    Medications which can affect your ability to drive safely include:

    • Diazepam
    • Oxazepam
    • Lorazepam
    • Methadone
    • Clonazepam
    • Temazepam
    • Flunitrazepam
    • Amphetamines
    • Morphine and other opioid-based drugs

    It’s illegal to drive in the UK if you’re taking any medication which affects your ability to drive safely.

    If you’re not sure if a condition or medication could affect your ability to drive, ask your doctor.

    If you don’t disclose your medical status:

    • Your insurance could be invalidated
    • The DVLA could fine you up to £1,000
    • If you have an accident, you could be prosecuted

    Source: gov.uk medical conditions, disabilities and driving

  • If you’re unhappy with your car insurance policy, or the service we’ve provided, we’d really appreciate you contacting us so we can find a way to help.

    We hope it won’t get that far, but of course you can make a complaint if you’re dissatisfied. You’ll find all the information you’ll need on our dedicated complaints page.

  • For support with a bereavement, please see our bereavement support

  • You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time. Using My Account you can:

    • get a quote for a second car
    • manage payments and renewals
    • add or remove named drivers
    • change your address and contact details
    • view, download or print your policy documents
    • change vehicle, what it’s used for, or the level of cover

    If you’d prefer to make changes by phone, you can call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    Important: policy changes could affect the cost of your premium.

  • You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. This includes the option to switch your cover to another vehicle.

    If you’d prefer to make changes by phone, you can call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    Important: policy changes could affect the cost of your premium.

  • In short, yes. A change in your employment status might also signal a change in your insurance needs.

    If you’ve lost your job – although this can be a stressful time and the last thing you really want is an increase in the cost of your insurance premium, you could risk your policy being invalidated if you can’t give proof of occupation when requested.

    Unemployed people could be charged higher premiums because:

    • they’re driving more and to unfamiliar places in search of work
    • there’s potential that they’ll spend less on vehicle maintenance

    If you’ve moved to a new job – the cost of your insurance premium could go up or down, depending on the nature of your role. Just as insurers track information about accident and crime hot spots, they also know which jobs potentially expose drivers to a higher level of risk.

    Again, it could invalidate your insurance if you don’t give accurate information. If you had an accident, you definitely don’t want to risk having your claim rejected.

    If you’ve moved to a new employer, but you’re continuing in the same line of work, you only need to let your insurer know if the way you use your car has changed significantly.

    If you’ve recently retired – the cost of your insurance could potentially go down, simply because you’re less likely to be travelling during busy times of day.

  • Cancellation fees may apply. Please refer to your policy documents for details.

    If you do cancel your policy and still have a car which needs to be insured, make sure you have a new policy in place to pick up from the date that your old policy ends.

  • Yes, please get in touch if you’re struggling to manage your regular policy payments. Don’t wait until you miss a payment to speak to us – we’re here to help.

    Call: 0344 209 0471

    Speak to a representative Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 8am-6pm, or 10am-4pm on Sun and bank holidays.

    We ask that you don’t cancel your payments or Direct Debits as your policy could be cancelled as a result, leaving you uninsured.

    When you call, our specialists will chat through your situation with you, then find a way to help. This could involve agreeing partial payments or a payment holiday, just while you get things back under control.

  • Yes, although it could increase the cost of your car insurance premium, it’s important to tell your insurer about any penalty points or driving convictions you receive.

    If you don’t keep your driving history up to date, it could invalidate your insurance. If you have an accident, you don’t want to risk having your claim refused, or your policy voided.

    Learn more about driving offenses and penalty points at gov.uk.

Manage your policy

You can access and manage your Halifax car insurance policy online at any time using My Account. If you need support, we’re just a phone call away.

Existing customer support

You might also like

Halifax is a division of Bank of Scotland plc. Registered in Scotland No. SC327000. Registered Office: The Mound, Edinburgh EH1 1YZ. Bank of Scotland plc is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under registration number 169628.